Archive for the ‘audio’ Category

in the mood

April 28, 2010

The villa was lovely with its view of the beach and heated pool.  I could have remained on the porch indefinitely watching coffee cups, wine glasses, and olive pits pile up. Instead, a morsel of motivation prevailed.

We piled into the mini van and, after an hour of wrong turns and Google maps, found the village. A castle rose from the top of the hill, guarded by a statue of a 12 foot tall knight in full armor. Did someone say M’lady?

We passed through the gates and entered the 13th century.

It took me a moment before noticing the music.

No apps. No guided tours. Just the sounds of classical guitar filling up the courtyard and mingling with the ruins. We climbed ramparts and looked over the turrets. Easy to imagine busy markets or peasants below.

Sometimes, in advertising,  we get so caught up in embellishing moments with a special effect or over-the-top visuals that we forget the simple power of music to move us. It weaves an atmosphere and helps tell a story.

In this spot below for Che Men’s Magazine, I love how the music puts us in the mood.

What music puts you in the mood?

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lingo stars

March 8, 2010

Give me fifteen minutes with a new on-air talent. I’ll tell you if they have breakout potential. How? By listening to them talk.

Breakout talent speak a different language from the rest of us.

Cruise the top ranked personalities of 2009. Rush Limbaugh? “Dittoheads” know their leader. Oprah Winfrey has her “aha moments.” John Stewart, “Not so much.”

One of my favorites, Rachael Ray, brings a whole new vocabulary to cooking. When she calls olive oil “EVOO,” or declares “Yummo” after tasting a “spoonola,” she’s telling us that food isn’t serious. It’s fun and colorful and just us guys hanging around the counter.

What’s your brand lingo telling everyone?

sounds like genius

February 22, 2010

First, a confession. I’ve always been a sucker for radio.

You supply the story, the audience supplies the pictures. Now that’s interactive. Plus, compared to print and television, radio is inexpensive to produce. $500 for an award-winning spot? That’s how much my first clio winner cost.

Turns out, audio is even more powerful that we thought. Two recent articles reveal how aural persuasion taps our unconscious.


In this week’s Time magazine,  Martin Lindstrom, author of the best seller “Buyology”, hooked up participants to neoro-sensors. He discovered that some sounds zap right past our thinking brains and compel us in primal ways. Irresistable forces.

The New York Times magazine looks at how the top two contenders for Best Picture, “Hurt Locker” and “Avatar”, both use sound to create entirely new worlds. The lush jungles of Pandora and the dry, still world of bomb defusers — would either movie be as effective without their world of sound? Not likely.

How are you using sound to change minds?